Behavioural problems in childhood are very natural, but in some cases they go beyond what is normally expected. All behaviour is there for a reason; even unreasonable behaviour will have a motive behind it. Sometimes it is very difficult for parents or teachers to understand the reason behind the behaviour. However, if we think of child behavioural problems as a form of communication, we just need to ask, what is the behaviour trying to communicate? To illustrate this here are some examples:

Scenario 1: A child in school was constantly getting out of her seat in class irritating the teacher. No matter how many times she was told off for wondering off her seat she continued to do this and continued to be punished for it. However, another teacher realised that there was a pattern to the child’s wandering. She always went towards the blackboard. After putting her seat closer and closer to the blackboard, the child still got up and went to it. The teacher finally asked the mother to have the child’s eyes tested. It turned out that she could not see and she needed thick glasses.

Scenario 2: A young boy was constantly getting into trouble at school, and the parents were constantly being called in to see the headmaster. This, instead of improving his behaviour, had the opposite effect, it happened more often. Eventually the real motive for his behaviour was found. The only time his divorcing parents were in the same room paying him any attention, was when the headmaster summoned them.

Scenario 3: Children have a natural need to understand the world and the things that happen around them, when there is no explanation available the use their imagination to explain things often leading to misunderstandings.  A child got increasingly jealous of her brother and her behaviour deteriorated leading to frequent tantrums and sullen moods for no apparent reason. The cause of this was found some time later when she admitted that she felt angry because her parents obviously loved her brother more than her.  Evidence of this was that the mother, and sometimes both parents, very often took her brother out, while she was always left behind with a relative or a friend. What she had not understood is that all the outings where to hospitals and medical appointment for her brother complex medical needs that she was not able to understand. The parents thinking that she was too young to understand complex things did not always give explanations, they simply made sure that she was well looked after in their absence, without realising the effect that their unexplained trips with her brother was having on her.

Some unusual child behavioural problems can be just part of the child’ personality or they might be in response of something that has happen to the child that the parents or teachers are not aware of. Other times they are in response to something that the child might have heard or misheard and misinterpreted. However, other types of child behavioural problems could be indicative of possible conditions or of an unusually sensitive nervous system. Child behavioural problems can be related to many things such as eating, sleeping, communication, breaking rules, aggression, extreme shyness, social withdrawal, sensory sensitivities, etc…

I can help and support you in dealing child behavioural problems such as: Autism, Asperger’s Syndrome, Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Conduct Disorder and Eating Disorders through our parent workshops; dealing with stress through counselling and hypnotherapy or 1:1 coaching.

We offer a FREE initial 30-minute call to discuss your individual requirements

The Small Print: All sessions are to be paid for in advance. Cancellations with less than 24hrs notice will be charged at the full price. Late arrivals will result in a shorter session. Gloria is a member of the National Hypnotherapy Society and the National Counselling Society and as such she adheres to their codes of Ethics.

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